Recent bird sightings

/Recent bird sightings
Recent bird sightings 2018-08-17T12:57:40+00:00

Ottawa and area bird sightings to 16 August 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Cooper’s Hawk, photographed at Strathcona Park by Judith Gustafsson

It was a rather quiet week, threatening rain most days but very little actually fell.  Migration proceeded steadily but slowly, and there was not a huge change from the week before.

A COMMON GOLDENEYE at Shirley’s bay on the 14th was the only thing noteworthy among the WATERFOWL.

The lack of rain has exposed more habitat in places like Shirley’s Bay.  90 birds of 10 species were there on the 15th, and 15 birds of 5 species were at Andrew Haydon Park on the same. In both cases, only the more common species were seen. At Embrun, nearly 100 birds of 8 species were also present on the 15th; a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was the only notable species.

COMMON NIGHTHAWKS have started migrating south. Up to 30 were in Carleton Place on the 13th, and smaller numbers were seen on the 15th. 43 were also seen at Deschênes on the 15th. Expect to see them regularly for the next few weeks.

This was a good week for VIREOS. A YELLOW-THROATED VIREO was in Riverton Park on the 15th.  PHILADELPHIA VIREOS at were seen in a number of places, and there were 2 BLUE-HEADED VIREOS at Britannia on the 12th.

The first BLACKPOLL WARBLER of the season was at Shirley’s Bay on the 10th. Another was in Britannia on the 12th.  Only 2 of the 25 regular WARBLERS have not yet been seen this fall. Speaking of WARBLERS, Britannia remains the hotspot, with CAPE MAY WARBLER still the most common. On the 15th there were also good numbers at Shirley’s Bay, but so far there are rather few anywhere else.

8 VESPER SPARROWS were at Burnt Lands Provincial Park on the 15th, and the other specialties there will likely be around for a few more weeks.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.

Lesser Yellowlegs photographed at Petrie Island by Keith Wickens

 

Wilson’s Snipe photographed at Petrie Island by Keith Wickens

 


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 9 August 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Cape May Warbler photographed by Judith Gustafsson at Strathcona Park.

The highlight of the week was an EARED GREBE, seen on the 7th from Shirley’s Bay going downriver. Unfortunately it was not relocated.

Weather continued with above seasonal temperatures and continued damp conditions, which did nothing to improve the SHOREBIRD situation. Some spots, though, had a good variety of migrant SONGBIRDS, although song activity is now minimal.

CASPIAN TERNS are around in modest numbers from Shirley’s Bay to Gatineau, and a LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was at the Moodie Drive ponds on the 4th.

The best spot for SHOREBIRDS is Embrun with nearly 100 birds of 7 species on the 7th, mostly LESSER YELLOWLEGS but including a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE. The PEEP flock of a few days earlier has cleared out.

About 25 birds of 7 species were at Constance Bay (2 different spots) on the 7th, including a SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER and SANDERLING.  This spot is worth checking if the water levels ever drop.

On the 8th Shirley’s Bay had 7 birds of 3 species, but there were quite a few more a few days earlier. We are still waiting for good water levels and the return of some of the numbers of a few weeks ago.

In Gatineau, A BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER was at Deschênes on the 3rd and a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER was at Parc Brébeuf on the 3rd.

A PECTORAL SANDPIPER was among a few other common species north of Russell on the 7th, and on the 5th there were 27 birds of 4 species in Russell, all common.

Juvenile Broad-winged Hawk photographed by Tony Beck near Navan.

There were no SHOREBIRDS at St. Albert or Crysler on the 7th, but 18 birds of 5 species at the Crysler Waterfall on the 4th.

At Petrie Island on the 8th there were small number of common species, with very little habitat.

There were at times astounding numbers of CAPE MAY WARBLERS in Britannia, up to 50, have been seen, enjoying the delicious bounty of Chironomids (a fancy name for a kind of midge).  The numbers were much lower on the 9th. Up to 12 species on WARBLER have been seen there on trips, and at times the Shirley’s Bay woods have variety, but there is still very little migrant variety elsewhere.

In other odds and ends:

  1. A PHILADELPHIA VIREO was at Britannia on the 8th
  2. 2 RED-HEADED WOODPECKERS were in Constance Bay on the 2nd
  3. A YELLOW-THROATED VIREO at Constance Bay on 7th
  4. An EVENING GROSBEAK was in Parkway Park on the 6th
  5. 2 SEDGE WRENS were in the Richmond fen on the 5th

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 2 August 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Rose-breasted Grosbeak photographed on the south side of Mud Lake by Deborah Mosher.

There have been a surprising number of migrant SONGBIRDS, and some SHOREBIRD habitat is returning after the heavy rains of the previous week, although it still remains damp.

Some other signs of fall migration are evident. Bird song is now at a very low level. Some birds, especially SWALLOWS, are flocking. There were 800 TREE SWALLOWS noted in Russell on the 1st.

Shirley’s Bay is regaining some of the lost SHOREBIRD habitat, but recently only a small number of SHOREBIRDS of common species have been there.  On the 2nd, there were about 20 birds of 5 species. Embrun on the 1st was good with about 60 birds of 11 species, including AMERICAN GOLDEN-PLOVER and STILT SANDPIPER. In Crysler on the 28th, there were 25 birds of 7 species.  Petrie Island had minimal habitat on the 30th.  Other notable sightings included a SANDERLING at Deschênes on the 28th, and a RUDDY TURNSTONE at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 28th and on the 1st.

CASPIAN TERN numbers are building up.  23 were at Deschênes on the 1st, and 17 at Shirley’s bay on the 31st.  A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was at Deschênes on the 28th.   A LEAST BITTERN was at Stony Swamp on the 29th.

A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO and YELLOW-THROATED VIREO were at Shirley’s bay on the 31st.

One of two Turkey Vultures photographed in Vanier by Eric Leger.

Of interest this week were a fairly large number, this early in the season, of migrant SONGBIRDS at Britannia, Shirley’s Bay, and Aylmer (near the river), with up to 12 species being seen in a trip. The most surprising was a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER at Britannia on the 1st.  There were a few TENNESSEE WARBLERS, many YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS, higher than expected numbers of CAPE MAY WARBLERS.  It is worth noting that this variety was not seen in other large migrant traps like Petrie Island.  At any rate, we are now in the season where checking migrant traps regularly is beneficial, if not essential.

Finally, 3 PINE SISKINS touched down briefly at a park in the west end on the 26th.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 26 July 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Red Knot photographed by Adolf Kendall at Shirley’s Bay.

A major rarity ended, at least temporarily, the summer doldrums. A RED KNOT, not seen in the region for 10 years, was flying along the Ottawa River on the 22nd and it landed at Shirley’s Bay, where it was seen for most of the day. If that were not enough, 2 WHIMBRELS and a RUDDY TURNSTONE were also there, although the WHIMBRELS touched down for less than an hour.

Whimbrels photographed by Vincent Fyson at Shirley’s Bay.

This week there was major enhancement of the quantities and variety of SHOREBIRDS, until the rains came. Shirley’s Bay habitat was still ideal as of the 22nd, when there were nearly 200 birds of up to 10 species, over 130 of which were a flock of SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.  On the 23rd there were nearly 400 birds of 8 species, with nearly 300 SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.  Other uncommon species there this week included BAIRD’S SANDPIPER on the 23rd and 4 STILT SANDPIPERS on the 24th. For the next several weeks, this spot will merit regular inspection, as the water levels decline (we hope).

A weather change on the 22nd brought blustery winds and some rain. It was likely this that brought the SHOREBIRD fallout at Shirley’s Bay on the 22nd.  Heavy rain on the 23rd and especially the 25th has eliminated most of the river habitat for a little while.

Other areas with SHOREBIRDS included:

  • Crysler has good habitat as of the 25th, but only 35 birds of 4 species, mostly a flock of unidentified PEEPS.
  • Embrun has some good habitat. On the 21st there were about 60 birds of 7 species. On the 25th there were 200 birds of 10 species including WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER.
  • Petrie Island (west of the causeway) had good habitat with up to 40 birds of 5 species on the 22nd. Of course the rains have eliminated this habitat.
  • A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was reported at the Giroux Road ponds on the 24th.
  • The Ottawa River shore (in Ontario) has a lot of really good habitat.There were about 50 birds of 7 species at Ottawa Beach on the 25th.  Also there was a RUDDY TURNSTONE on the 22nd and 3 on the 25th. A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was there on the 24th. Up to 4 SANDERLINGS have been seen from here to Shirley’s Bay until the 25th.   SANDERLINGS have been seen elsewhere, including Constance Bay, Embrun and Barnsdale Road.
  • Parc Brébeuf had 30 birds of 4 species on the 24th. Finally a few SHOREBIRDS in Gatineau!
  • Almonte had 35 birds of 6 species on the 24th.

The low water on the Ottawa River had also resulted in good sightings of marsh birds when they make forays to the shallow water/ mud flats near the edge of the marsh. Both Shirley’s bay and Petrie Island have been good for RAILS and COMMON GALLINULE. 2 LEAST BITTERNS were showing well at Petrie Island until the 21st.  2 LEAST BITTERNS were at Baie McLaurin on the 20th.

Aside from SHOREBIRDS, there has been little to report. Some noteworthy sightings included:

  • A female NORTHERN PINTAIL was at Shirley’s bay on the 21st-22nd.
  • A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at Deschê
  • nes on the 21st.
  • Small numbers of CASPIAN TERNS are at Shirley’s Bay almost every day.
  • 1 BLACK TERN at Petrie Island on the 24th.
  • 3 continuing SANDHILL CRANES were on March Road as late as the 23rd.
  • On the 25th, 2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were in Constance Bay along with 120 BOBOLINKS, a very high number.

There are some significant signs of migration.  SWALLOWS have started to flock, and SONGBIRDS have started to disperse from their nesting grounds.  Now is a good time to start checking the migrant traps.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 19 July 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Newly fledged Northern Cardinal having a vigorous bath. Photographed in Orleans by Sherry Nigro.

The highlight this week was a WHIMBREL, seen briefly below the Deschênes rapids on the evening on the 14th.

Heat and dryness continued, and birder activity is low, but there are interesting developments on the SHOREBIRD front.

Green Heron photographed at Mud Lake by Deborah Mosher.

Shirley’s Bay now has a lot of excellent SHOREBIRD habitat.  While there have been no reports from along the river west of Britannia, it is likely getting good there too. At Shirley’s Bay, over 90% of the birds are LESSER YELLOWLEGS and KILLDEER, but this week 8 other species have been seen (but not all at the same time).  WILSON’S PHALAROPE, SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER and an early PECTORAL SANDPIPER were the most interesting.

There is developing habitat west of the causeway to Petrie Island, but so far just 4 species have been seen including SOLITARY SANDPIPER.

This is now a good time to start looking for SHOREBIRDS and suitable habitat, although it is still rather early in the season.

Other areas with SHOREBIRDS this week have included:

  • Only the nesting species at Almonte on the 15th.
  • 3 species including 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS in Russell on the 15th.
  • 20 birds of 4 species in Winchester on the 12th.

Three of seven juvenile Hooded Mergansers photographed at Strathcona Park by Judith Gustafsson.

A few other notable sightings included:

  • 2 lingering SNOW GEESE were at Winchester on the 12th.
  • A LESSER SCAUP was at Shirley’s Bay on the 17th.
  • 3 SANDHILL CRANES have been on a field south of Carp for nearly the last week.
  • 1 LEAST BITTERN was at Baie McLaurin this week, and 2 were at Petrie Island on the 16th. 1 is also seen sometimes at Shirley’s Bay.
  • Up to 3 CASPIAN TERNS have been between Shirley’s Bay and Deschênes as late as the 17th.
  • A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK was in Carp on the 17-18th.
  • A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL continues at the Moodie Drive ponds as of the 13th.

Ottawa and area bird sightings to 12 July 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Black-crowned Night Heron photographed by Judith Gustafsson at Brewer Park.

Again there were no major highlights this week, as the summer doldrums continue. The heat moderated somewhat, but it is now getting very dry.

There are signs of the progress of the season. There are more young seen, and bird song is noticeably diminishing.

2 SNOW GEESE in Winchester on the 8th were an interesting lingerer.

The lack of rain has resulted in a drop of levels on the Ottawa River, and it will be interesting to see what things will be like in 4 weeks.  In the meantime, a few of the more common SHOREBIRDS have been seen:

  • Shirley’s Bay:2 GREATER and 40 LESSER YELLOWLEGS on the 10th
  • Russell: 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS in Russell on the 6th
  • Winchester:1 each of SEMIPALMATED and SOLITARY SANDPIPER on the 8th
  • Petrie Island: 1 SOLITARY SANDPIPER on the 10th
  • Carp: 1 LEAST SANDPIPER on the 6th
  • Crysler: 1 LESSER YELLOWLEGS on the 8th

Adult Grackle with fledling photographed by Judith Gustafsson near Billings Bridge.

2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS were in Chesterville on the 10th, and 2 were on Franktown Road near Munster on the 7th.

Single GREAT and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS were at the Moodie Drive ponds on the 6th.  15 BLACK TERNS were at Plaisance (Baie Noire) on the 8th, and 1 was at Shirley’s Bay on the 7th. 1 CASPIAN TERN was at Petrie Island on the 9th.

2 LEAST BITTERNS were at Shirley’s bay on the 7th and 1 on the 9th.  BLACK TERN at Shirley’s Bay on nthe 7th.

EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILLS were heard at several locations in the Munster area on the 7th.

A YELLOW-THROATED VIREO at Britannia on the 9th, and a BLUE-HEADED VIREO was in Stony Swamp on the 11th.

Young Great Blue Heron photographed at Brown’s Inlet in the Glebe by Judith Gustafsson.

An early TENNESSEE WARBLER, also a late one as it was unfortunately a window fatality, was downtown on the 10th.  2 TENNESSEE WARBLERS were in Gatineau on the 11th.

A PINE SISKIN flew over Britannia on the 7th, and 2 have been in the western part of Larose forest for several weeks now. Finally, 3 RED CROSSBILLS were seen on Corkstown Road flying north on the 6th.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 5 July 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Yellow Warbler in a tree along the Rideau River near Carleton University. Photo by Judith Gustafsson.

There were no major highlights this week, as the summer doldrums continue. The ferocious heat has probably kept a lot of birders in air-conditioned buildings. However, birding or no birding, there is still an excellent variety of birds in the region. This is a good time to head into the dense forests of the north, like the area north of Buckingham, to see the surprising variety of nesting birds that will rarely be seen in the more urban areas until fall migration is in full swing.

Of interest is that the first fall SHOREBIRDS have actually arrived, although this is more of a technicality than a migration:

  • A GREATER YELLOWLEGS in Almonte on the 5th,
  • A SOLITARY SANDPIPER in Carp on the 28th, and
  • A LESSER YELLOWLEGS in Carp on the 3rd.

Other notable sightings included:

  • An UPLAND SANDPIPER in Dunrobin on the 2nd.
  • A RED-HEADED WOODPECKER in Carp on the 3rd.
  • A very late ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK in Almonte on the 2nd.
  • A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 1st.
  • A CASPIAN TERN in Almonte on the 2nd.
  • 5 BLACK TERNS at Marais des Laîches on the 3rd.
  • A LEAST BITTERN at Shirley’s Bay on the 1st.
  • A SEDGE WREN south of Munster on the 29th.

Swamp Sparrow photographed by Gregory Zbitnew at the Findlay Creek Boardwalk.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 28 June 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Young male Downy Woodpecker at the Fletcher Wildlife Garden. Photo by Judith Gustafsson

We are well into the summer doldrums, and things have been and will likely remain relatively static for the next 4 weeks. Weather was seasonal, but the forecast heat wave will likely mean birds will not remain active as late in the morning.

Among the WATERBIRDS, a late BUFFLEHEAD was at Shirley’s Bay on the 26th, and a late RING-NECKED DUCK at Britannia also on the 26th.  7 RUDDY DUCKS in Russell on the 24th are likely nesting.

3 LEAST BITTERNS were at Baie McLaurin on the 27th, and 2 were at Constance Creek on the 24th.

A CASPIAN TERN has been seen from time to time on the Ottawa River between Britannia and Shirley’s Bay, and 3 BLACK TERNS were at Marais des Laiches on the 23rd.

Male House Finch photographed at Brewer Park by Judith Gustafsson.

2 UPLAND SANDPIPERS in Constance Bay on the 26th, and a GRAY PARTRIDGE was in Kanata on the 26th (off Robert Grant).

Thomas Dolan (Carp Ridge) is still excellent for both WHIP-POOR-WILL and COMMON NIGHTHAWK.

A  SEDGE WREN was on Stonecrest as late as the 23rd, and was sometimes vocal. At the same spot, a SONG SPARROW was singing very much like a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER, which species has been seen in the area.

On the 26th a PINE SISKIN was seen and heard on Viewbank near Greenbank.

Both CLAY-COLOURED and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS were at Burnt Lands Provincial Park this week.

There have been no recent reports from the northern reaches of the region, but the marshes in Quebec east of the Gatineau River and areas of the greenbelt in Ontario have had good diversity of species.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.

Black-crowned Night Heron catching a Bullhead, which he swallowed whole. Photo taken at Mud Lake by Deborah Mosher.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 21 June 2018

House Wren on birdbox, photographed by Judith Gustafsson

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Like last week, it was relatively static and only expected birds were seen. Of the less common nesters, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO was at Petrie Island on the 15th and near Club de Ski Nakkertok on the 17th.  While we normally don’t mention OWL sightings, there were 2 unusually late ones of SNOWY OWL, one in Gatineau on the 15th and one in Orleans on the 17th.

Weather was mostly seasonal, with some rain and the hottest days of the year so far.

Somewhat surprising were 6(!) LEAST BITTERNS observed on a canoe trip on the Jock River (Goodwood Marsh) on the 20th, which proves that these elusive birds are more common than it seems. Also seen there was a family of 8 TRUMPETER SWANS.

The only spots for BLACK TERN now seem to be the marshes in Quebec east of Gatineau. 5 were seen at the Halte Routière east of Thurso on the 17th. A LEAST BITTERN was at the Marais aux grenouillettes on the same day.    2 LEAST BITTERNS were at Baie McLaurin on the 19th.

An AMERICAN COOT and a LEAST BITTERN were at Shirley’s bay on the 16th.

Male Tree Swallow stretching its wings at Brewer Park Pond, photographed by Judith Gustafsson

A CASPIAN TERN was at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 21st, an UPLAND SANDPIPER was on Franktown road on the 19th, SANDHILL CRANE on Dwyer Hill Road on the 17th, and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL on the 16th at the Moodie Drive Ponds.

Of the SONGBIRDS, a long trip in the western part of Gatineau Park on the 16th produced 15 WARBLERS plus other birds. Likely any of the forested belt there will produce something similar.

Among other SONGBIRDS:

  • A SEDGE WREN was west of Munster on the 20th, and on Montague boundary Road on the 18th there was another plus an EASTERN TOWHEE.
  • 2 PINE SISKINS were flying over north of Pink Road on the 18th.
  • A late TENNESSEE WARBLER was at Club de ski Nakkertok on the 17th.
  • 2 GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLERS were near Thomas Dolan on the 17th.
  • Burnt Lands Provincial Park, as usual, was good for SPARROWS, in particular on the 19th there were GRASSHOPPER, CLAY-COLOURED, and VESPER SPARROWS.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.

Newly fledged Cowbird, begging for food from its “foster mother” Song Sparrow, photographed near Carleton University by Judith Gustafsson


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 14 June 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Eastern Bluebird with green worm photographed by Judith Gustafsson near Wakefield.

There were no major highlights this week. Most notable were a few sightings of YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, one in Rockcliffe park on the 9th, one near Cannamore (Reveler recreational trails) on the 10-11th and one on the Jock River near Richmond on the 11th.  A YELLOW-THROATED VIREO was in the same place on the Jock River on the 11th as well.

There were no new arrivals this week, and migration was virtually nil this week, save for a few stragglers.  However, this is prime time for looking for residents. In the last week, over 150 species have been seen in the region, and all but a few late migrants will still be around.

There were 30 BRANT seen (over) the Richmond Fen on the 8th, but these are probably the last stragglers. Regionally only 11 species of DUCK have been seen, and only the expected nesters.

Brown Thrasher – “singing like crazy” – photographed by Eric Leger at Conroy Pit.

LEAST BITTERNS have been seen a few places: 2 at Constance Creek and Thomas Dolan on the 11th, one at Constance Creek from Vances Sideroad on the 10th, and one at Parc Martin Larouche on the 9th.

A few late migrants such as WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER were seen as late as the 10th, but as expected migration is over.  An UPLAND SANDPIPER was on March Road north of Burnt Lands PP on the 12th.

A RED-SHOULDERED HAWK on Hall Road on the 11th, and a late OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was in Gatineau Park (Nakkertok) on the 10th.

A SEDGE WREN was on Stonecrest on the 11th, and 3 SEDGE WRENS were in the Richmond Fen on the 8th.  There are still up to 2 at the “Nortel marsh” as late as the 10th.

A GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER was on Thomas Dolan on the 11th although the precise location was not indicated.

Finally, a PINE SISKIN was at Lac Mcgregor on the 10th.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.

Female Hooded Merganser with her young, photographed by Deborah Mosher at Britannia.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 7 June 2018

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

There were a number of highlights this week.  The best was an adult-plumaged EARED GREBE, the first Ottawa County record (and the bird was sometimes in Gatineau), off Britannia Pier on the 1st.  In second place was an adult SABINE’S GULL, seen for a few minutes at Britannia Point on the 4th.  In a distant 3rd place was a co-operative MARBLED GODWIT in Kanata on the 5-7th.  The runner-up was the WHITE-WINGED DOVE which was heard again on the 1st in the Urbandale area. This DOVE could easily linger for some time, but there is an excessive amount of suitable habitat, consisting of hundreds of well-treed backyards.

Marbled Godwit photographed by Michael Tate in Kanata.

Migration is clearly winding down, with 99.9% of the PASSERINES here for the season or gone until the fall. SHOREBIRD migration is probably over 95% completed. The rainy and blustery weather on the 4-6th may have been a factor in some of the rarities this week.

Most WATERFOWL remaining are the regular nesters, now mostly in the inland ponds and lagoons.  Some notable sightings were 5 RED-BREASTED MERGANSERS at Britannia on the 5th ,  2 RING-NECKED DUCKS at Constance Creek on the 2nd, and a GREATER SCAUP at Shirley’s Bay on the 2nd.

Some other interesting SHOREBIRDS were seen despite the rather small numbers. A SANDERLING (rare in the spring) was at Britannia Beach on the 1-7th.  During the rainstorms, 50 or so SHOREBIRDS were at both Embrun and Chrysler.  RED-NECKED PHALAROPES and RUDDY TURNSTONES were seen at both places. On the 6th, a cooperative RUDDY TURNSTONE was at Britannia Beach.  There is probably about another week for the last stragglers to come through.

TERNS were in the news, with a single long-awaited ARCTIC TERN at Britannia Point on the 3-4th and again on the 6th. 2 BLACK TERNS were there on the 4th, and one CASPIAN TERN was at Deschênes on the 3rd.   A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was at the Moodie Drive ponds on the 3rd to the 5th.

Other notable sightings included:

  • YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO in Richmond on the 6th.
  • PHILADELPHIA VIREO in Gatineau near Gatineau Park on the 3rd.
  • YELLOW-THROATED VIREO at the West March Highlands on the 2nd.
  • 2 SEDGE WRENS still at the “Nortel” marsh off Moodie Drive until the 5th
  • GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH on Munster Road on the 6th.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.

Sanderling photographed by Michael Tate at Britannia Pier.


Earlier sightings are available on request ofnc@ofnc.ca