Owl logo The Ottawa Field-Naturalists' Club

Birding in Ottawa


OFNC home page
Coming events
Birding
Publications
Fletcher Wildlife Garden
Conservation
Awards
Macoun Club for young naturalists
FalconWatch
Committees and Board
Join the OFNC/make a donation
Links
Search
Contact us

Get help identifying a bird
Report a bird sighting

Can't find Milton Road? Not sure where the Sarsaparilla Trail is?
Check the Birds Committee's location guide, complete with species to watch for and directions for getting to the best birding spots in the Ottawa region.

Code of conduct
Due to increasing and widespread concerns regarding disturbance of wildlife and property, the OFNC's Birds Committee no longer reports owl sightings on the Internet. We will continue to encourage the reporting of owls to sightings@ofnc.ca for the purpose of maintaining local records. Please refer to the OFNC Code of Conduct.

Important notices

ACCESS TO THE SHIRLEY’S BAY CAUSEWAY

Our Birds Committee has obtained permission for OFNC members to use the causeway, which was closed recently because of safety concerns. However, you MUST call the Range Control Office (613-991-5740) before you arrive. You must give your name and state that you are an OFNC member. DND has been provided with our membership list and they will check your name against it. You must also call again when you have left the area. OFNC members access the property entirely at their own risk.

RICHMOND CONSERVATION AREA: The conservation area and paths in the conservation area in the Village of Richmond are part of an active construction zone and are closed to the public until the area is considered safe for the public to access. The closed area is bounded by Eagleson Road to the east, McBean to the west, the Jock River to the north, and portions of Ottawa Street to the south. This includes the Richmond Conservation Area.

Please note: The copyright for all photos on this web site belongs to the photographer. The OFNC reserves the right to use these photos in other parts of the web site. To contribute photos or report bird sightings, please email sightings@ofnc.ca

Please also note: The OFNC's Birds Committee no longer reports owl sightings on the Internet. We will continue to encourage the reporting of owls to sightings@ofnc.ca for the purpose of maintaining local records.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 17 August 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Common Gallinule photographed at the Embrun lagoon by Sai Wai Ip


There were two minor highlights this week. A YELLOW-THROATED VIREO was seen in Carp this week, but unfortunately not seen again. On the 13th there were 2 RED-NECKED PHALAROPES at Embrun and 1 at St. Albert.

There was some good news for birding this week. The Shirley’s Bay causeway is now accessible for birders, but there are new access rules. Please see the note at the end of this report for details.

It was a relatively dry week in the region, but SHOREBIRDS are in poor supply everywhere. PASSERINE variety has noticeably increased but there has been little but the expected birds.

Of the WATERBIRDS, there has been nothing to write home about except for a HORNED GREBE at Embrun on the 14th and a REDHEAD at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 12th.

Unfortunately, as of the 17th, there were NO mudflats at Shirley’s Bay and NO SHOREBIRDS. A slight rise in the Ottawa River has eliminated even the tiny emerging mudflats of last week. However, a BAIRD’S SANDPIPER was in the area on the 13th before the water levels rose. Aside from what was noted above, Casselman, Embrun and St. Albert had only a small number of common species this week. The same was true for the Carp River.

Up to 3 or 4 LEAST BITTERNS are still being seen regularly off Rivington in Carp.

There has definitely been a movement from the north. A YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER was in Richmond on the 13th, and an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER was in Britannia on the 10th. COMMON NIGHTHAWKS and gathering flocks of SWALLOWS are becoming a little more conspicuous.


Canada Warbler photographed at Mud Lake by Nina Stavlund


PASSERINES are becoming a little more conspicuous too in the “hot” areas like Britannia and Trail 10 near Shirley’s Bay. PHILADELPHIA VIREOS have been seen a few times this week, and BLUE-HEADED VIREOS are fairly regular.

WARBLERS have been of interest this week. We are now in the season where any of the 25 regulars can be seen almost anywhere. This last week, 23 species have been seen and an additional one is probably around. A GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER in Aylmer on the 11th was of interest. WILSON’S WARBLER and BLACKPOLL WARBLER were some of the non-breeders seen.

Finally, 5 RED CROSSBILLS were near Lac McGregor on the 16th.

Note regarding access to the Shirley’s Bay Causeway:
The causeway is DND property and was closed because it was considered unsafe, but the OFNC is again allowed to access it but now entirely at our own risk. The OFNC's agreement absolves DND of any and all liability if you are injured or killed on the property.

DND has also amended our access procedure. You must call Range Control (613-991-5740) for permission, state that you are an OFNC member and give your name. DND will be provided with the OFNC's membership list and they will check, so you need to keep your membership up to date. Finally, you must call again when you have left the area.

DND would also like to be informed if you see anyone on the property who should not be there, such as boats in the bay or people fishing on the causeway. They are trespassing and DND will deal with the situation.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 10 August 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Song Sparrow photographed near Britannia by Shawn Middleton


There were no real highlights this week, although there was a lowlight. Access to the Shirley’s Bay causeway is gone pending repair of damage due to the spring’s flood. This is a real disappointment given that this is the best area in Ottawa for SHOREBIRDS and WATERBIRDS.

The only consolation to this bad news is that it has been a dry week so water levels on the Ottawa River have dropped, which is starting to expose some shoreline, so that there are other places to look. Other than that, there have just been a few more signs of migration, and nothing worth chasing.

A LESSER SCAUP was at Embrun, along with a good variety of other common DUCKS and a family of AMERICAN COOT.

Here is the latest SHOREBIRD update:

Embrun: 40 birds of 10 species were seen on the 5th, in the usual limited habitat. A WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER was the least common species seen.

Andrew Haydon Park: A modest amount of habitat is showing, with small numbers of common species. The rest of the Ottawa River has only habitat on the extreme edges of the river.

Almonte: Very limited habitat and only common species.

Carp River Floodplain: An area in Carp seen from Rivington, and a more extensive area near Terry Fox and Richardson have some good habitat and a modest number of birds, but so far only common species have been seen.

Petrie Island: Some habitat is getting exposed near the edge of the marsh west of the causeway, but only KILLDEER and YELLOWLEGS have been seen recently.

Up to 4 LEAST BITTERN have been seen regularly in Carp on the Carp River.

Britannia, along with other migrant traps, are starting to perk up a bit. This week, some trips there have had up to 8 species of WARBLER, including BAY-BREASTED WARBLER. The last bit of news is of a CAROLINA WREN singing on Fisher Avenue on the 8th.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 3 August 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

There was actually a highlight this week, which is a bit of a novelty. An immature LITTLE GULL was seen in the Deschênes rapids on the 29-30th, although looks were fleeting on the 30th and it has not been seen since.

Other than that, dullness continues in the region, and not much searching is going on. It has been a mercifully dry week with some warm weather, but the Ottawa River remains high. It still needs to go down 30-40 centimeters.

Embrun has had a few birds, but not a lot. On the 2nd, there were 17 birds of 4 species, and 30 of 4 species on the 29th. There were 10 birds of 5 species on the Carp River Flood plain. All of these were common species.

CASPIAN TERN numbers are building up as the season progresses. There have been up to 8 at Deschênes this week, along with up to 5 BONAPARTE’S GULLS. A LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL has been at Deschênes and Moodie Drive this week.

A LEAST BITTERN was in Russell on the 30th.

A SEDGE WREN was heard at night on the 28th in Constance Bay.

A few YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS are showing up outside their nesting areas, which is definitely a “sign”. A TENNESSEE WARBLER was in Stony Swamp on the 1st.

There are still CLAY COLOURED and GRASSHOPPER SPARROWS at Burnt Lands Provincial Park, and on the 31st there was a flyover of 3 RED CROSSBILLS at Burnt lands PP on the 31st. With the great cone crop this year, we are hoping for more of this species later this year.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 27 July 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

There were two minor highlights this week. A breeding-plumaged LONG-BILLED DOWITCHER was on the Diamondview flood plain on the 21st, but not relocated. A RED-NECKED PHALAROPE was at Embrun on the 23rd.

There are continuing signs of migration, but mostly it is quiet adult birds and lots of young of the nesting birds that are being seen, often in confusing plumages.

The main factor affecting birding is that the Ottawa River remains high. Heavy rain on the 24th brought July rainfall a few millimeters shy of the record, dashing any immediate hopes of habitat on the Ottawa. Flooded fields and inland ponds are the only real options for finding shorebirds for now.

A COMMON GOLDENEYE at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 24th was the only WATERBIRD news of the week.

A SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER was heard flying over Barrhaven at night on the 25th, but the following is the status of some known and more usual SHOREBIRD areas:

  • Almonte: 4 shorebirds of 2 species on the 25th.
  • Embrun: 11 birds of 6 species on the 26th.
  • Russell: 1 SPOTTED SANDPIPER on the 26th.
  • Petrie: SEMIPALMATED PLOVER on the 25th. Any shorebirds are likely to be found on the east beach before the crowds (if any) arrive for beach activities.
  • Carp River flood plain: 45 birds of 6 species on the 26th.

Other notable sightings include:

  • A LEAST BITTERN IN Carp on the 26th.
  • Up to 5 LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULLS at the Moodie Drive Ponds.
  • 1 CASPIAN TERN at Petrie Island on the 27th, and 2 at Plaisance on the 23rd.
  • 2 (adult) SANDHILL CRANES on Smith Road on the 22nd.
  • 8 GRAY PARTRIDGES in Russell on the 25th, and 2 in Marathon on the 22nd.
  • A (silent) RED-HEADED WOODPECKER in Constance bay on the 25th.
  • 2 RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS in Larose forest on the 26th.
  • TENNESSEE WARBLER in Britannia on the 26th.
  • NORTHERN PARULA on Thomas Dolan on the 25th.
  • PINE SISKIN at Innis Point on the 22nd.

Ottawa and area bird sightings to 20 July 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Eastern Kingbird feeding fledgling at Kinburn. Photo by Nina Stavlund


Weather was generally seasonal, and so was the birding. However, there are early indications of fall migration and post-breeding dispersal. This is most noticeable among the SHOREBIRDS, with a few sightings of some numbers and variety.

Among the WATERBIRDS, the only sightings were of the common nesting species.

SHOREBIRD variety and number have increased considerably. There have been no reports from Shirley’s bay. While water levels on the Ottawa River have dropped a bit, perhaps another 30 cm drop should give us some real habitat. Flooded fields are currently the best bet for SHOREBIRDS. 2 such spots have been productive:

  • Up to 7 SANDERLING on John Shaw Road as late as the 19th. Also there were some larger numbers of LESSER YELLOWLEGS and other SHOREBIRDS.
  • 65 birds of 6 species at the Diamondview Flood plain on the 19th, including 6 SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. Note that these birds are distant and need good viewing conditions.

Some other spots have been:

  • 4 species of SHOREBIRD including SEMIPALMATED PLOVER on the 13th at the Moodie Drive ponds.
  • 35 birds of 6 species were at Embrun on the 17th, including 2 Sanderling.
  • 1 adult SANDERLING was at Petrie Island on the 17th.

A few other sightings of note include:

  • CASPIAN TERN at Plaisance on the 15th.
  • LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Moodie Drive Ponds as late as the 18th.
  • LEAST BITTERN at Constance Creek on the 15th.
  • YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO at the Reveler Recreational trails as late as the 16th.

Other than that, there are still lots of the regular nesters around, the numbers augmented by the often vocal young begging for food.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 13 July 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

Weather was generally seasonal, and so was the birding, which remained somewhat dull.

Among the WATERBIRDS, only the common/ regular nesters are around.

River levels on the Ottawa River are still too high for shorebirds, not that there are many around now, aside from the occasional LESSER YELLOWLEGS.

Some sightings of less common/ more local species include:

  • LESSER and GREATER BLACK-BACKED GULLS at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 8th.
  • YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO continues on Thomas Dolan.
  • SEDGE WREN in a grassy area east of Champlain street-an area that has not reported them recently. It has also been at the Nortel marsh on the 9th.
  • CASPIAN TERNS and BONAPARTE'S GULLS have been at Shirley's Bay.
  • LEAST BITTERN at Baie McLaurin on the 11th.

As last week, birders’ best bet is going to larger tracts of woods/ fields, especially north of Ottawa/ Gatineau.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 6 July 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Black-crowned Night Heron, photographed by Trudy Lothian at Mud Lake.


There were no real highlights this week.

Weather, especially on the weekend, was quite sodden until the 3rd, and as a result and combined with the holiday, there were not many birders out. The birding itself was as dull as dishwater. Young birds are becoming more apparent, and song volume has begun to diminish.

Among the WATERBIRDS, a BUFFLEHEAD at Shirley’s bay on the 2nd was interesting, as was a lingering SNOW GOOSE on North Russell Road on the 3rd. Inland ponds such as at Embrun hosted local nesters like AMERICAN WIGEON and NORTHERN SHOVELER, along with an AMERICAN COOT.

High water levels have done nothing for early SHOREBIRD returnees, although there was a LESSER YELLOWLEGS in Russel on the 3rd.


Young Robin, photographed by Trudy Lothian in Britannia village.


Some sightings of less common/ more local species include:

  • UPLAND SANDPIPER on the 4th on Fallowfield near Conley.
  • GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET and MOURNING WARBLER on the 4th at Pine Grove Trail.
  • 2 CASPIAN TERNS at Britannia on the 2nd.
  • WINTER WREN at Stony Swamp on the 4th.
  • BLUE-HEADED VIREO, WINTER WREN and EASTERN TOWHEE at the South March Highlands Conservation Forest on the 3rd.
  • YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO in Richmond on the 6th.

Larger tracts of woods/ fields are giving 40-50 species per outing, which seems the best bet for birding now.

Thanks to everyone who contributed bird observations. We encourage everyone to report their bird sightings on eBird for the benefit of the entire birding community. Good birding.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 29 June 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca

The highlight of the week was a BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, seen on Craig Henry on the 25th but not refound.

Weather has been cloudy, mostly cool and damp, having had more of an effect of reducing enthusiasm among birders than on the bird population. Birding has been generally dull. The only bright spot is that we are probably at the nadir of seasonal migration now, which means that things can only get better. Believe it or not there could well be a few (very few) arrivals/ dispersals by next week.

Among the WATERBIRDS, LESSER SCAUP was seen on the Ottawa River on the 23rd, a BUFFLEHEAD at Shirley’s bay on the 25th, and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER there on the 28th.

Some good news is that the marsh habitat at the end of Champlain Street has recovered to the extent that multiple SORA and VIRGINIA RAILS were calling. Likely this would be similar for other extensive marshes along the Ottawa River. A number of MARSH WRENS were seen this week at the Shirley's Bay Marsh.

Some notable sightings were:

  • LEAST BITTERN at Baie McLaurin on the 24th, and 2 at Constance Creek also on the 24th.
  • There was a late continuing LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Moodie Drive ponds until the 24th.
  • There have been a number of YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO sightings, in addition to the one on Thomas Dolan: one in Chelsea on the 26th, one in Carp on the 27th, and one at Shirley’s Bay on the 28th.
  • 3 RED CROSSBILLS near Lac McGregor on the 26th.
  • EVENING GROSBEAKS at the western edge of Larose Forest.

Ottawa and area bird sightings to 22 June 2017


Red Crossbills, photographed by Amy Lawes near Lac McGregor.


The highlight of the week was 2 WHITE PELICANS, west of Aylmer on the 16th, and seen flying over both Aylmer and Rockcliffe on the 17th, headed east. They have not been refound. Late news is of a BLUE-WINGED WARBLER found on the 13th in the South March Conservation Forest, and also not refound.

Aside from that, summer doldrums persist in Ottawa, and not so many birders are out. Weather has been more or less seasonal, although at this time of year this may not matter. The best bet at this time of year is to visit the great swathes of forest north and west of Ottawa. The Greenbelt lands are also quite good. Another option is to explore the underbirded areas like agricultural lands south and east of Ottawa, and hope for a rarity.

A few lingerers continue: BRANT at the Moodie drive ponds until the 19th, and a LESSER SCAUP at Shirley’s Bay earlier in the week and at Stony Swamp on the 20th. A report from the Shirley’s Bay causeway is not encouraging for the future. The part to the first island is damaged and very narrow in spots. Water levels are still high and the marsh is not well developed. Stay tuned for further developments.


Clay-colored Sparrow, photographed by Paul Matthews at Burnt lands Provincial Park.


Some notable sightings were:

  • There was a late LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL at the Moodie Drive ponds until the 19th, as well as a GREATER BLACK-BACKED GULL.
  • CASPIAN TERN is seen regularly on the Ottawa River west, but numbers have not built up yet.
  • LEAST BITTERN is still at Constance Creek as of the 18th.
  • A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO continues to be vocal and visible on the Thomas Dolan Parkway.
  • A RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER was on Montée Silver Creek on the 17th
  • A YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER was at the Mer Bleue Bog on the 17th
  • SEDGE WREN continues at the nortel marsh at least until the 20th
  • A NORTHERN PARULA was on Ridge Road near Anderson on the 17th. These more southern occurrences in the summer may be a sign of a range expansion
  • For those who don’t want to travel to Burnt Lands PP, 3 CLAY-COLOURED SPARROWS were at the north end of High Road on the 22nd.

In what is, we hope, not just a coincidence but a sign of some movement, there were 7 RED CROSSBILLS on Chemin Sauve near Lac McGregor on the 16th and 19th, and 4 of the same in the Pine Grove Forest east of Conroy on the 22nd.


Eastern Towhee, photographed by Richard Waters near the Thomas Dolan Parkway.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 15 June 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Yellow-throated Vireo photographed near Breckenridge by Tony Beck.


The highlight of the week was a YELLOW-THROATED VIREO near Breckenridge on the 9th, but not refound. Another interesting bird was a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD WAS on Montée Saint-Amour in Gatineau on the 13th.

The migration party is pretty much over for the season. Weather was consistently dry, sunny and warm, with 2 hot days. This is quite a novelty for the region, but with summer has come the summer doldrums. The woods, water bodies and fields are chock full of nesting birds; birders should head to the larger areas of undisturbed habitat for best results, but very little other than the expected birds are around.

Of the WATERBIRDS, the only things interesting have been a few lingerers. 2 LESSER SCAUP have been at Shirley’s Bay until the 11th, and one was at Andrew Haydon on the 15th. A late BRANT was at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 15th.

The marsh habitat on the Ottawa River east of the city is still recovering from the ravages of the flood last month, and the numbers of marsh birds like RAILS and MARSH WREN are only a fraction of normal.

ARCTIC TERN was seen on and off at Britannia point until the 12th, and there are scattered sightings of CASPIAN TERNS. BONAPARTE’S GULLS were seen at Britannia Point, and LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was at the Moodie Drive Ponds until the 10th.

A GRAY PARTRIDGE was near Marchurst Road on the 9th.

This continues to be a really good year for CUCKOOS. A YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO has been seen regularly on Thomas Dolan near Stonecrest, and both species of CUCKOO were at the Champlain lookout on the 13th.


Yellow-billed Cuckoo, photographed by Martha Burchat on the Thomas Dolan Parkway.

One bit of good news is that SEDGE WRENS have returned to the marsh near Corkstown and Moodie.

BAY BREASTED WARBLER (probably a very late migrant) and PHILADELPHIA VIREO were in Gatineau Park-Sentiers des Loups on the 11th.

Burnt Lands Provincial Park continues to be excellent for grassland birds such as UPLAND SANDPIPER, GRASSHOPPER and CLAY-COLOURED SPARROWS. A late WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW was in Qualicum Park on the 8th.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 8 June 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Killdeer photographed at Petrie Island by Keith Wickens.


4 significant rarities highlighted the week. The most significant was an adult male BLUE GROSBEAK, a regional first, seen at a feeder near March Road and Dunrobin Road on the 3rd-4th. While not positively seen since, it may well be in the area as the habitat is suitable. On the 4th, a WESTERN GREBE was seen above the Deschênes Rapids. An adult FRANKLIN’S GULL was in the Britannia area from the 3-5th, and was seen in Kanata on the 7th. These last 2 were seen by many. Finally, a CONNECTICUT WARBLER was seen in the Mer Bleue area on the 5th, but was not relocated. While just outside the region, a CATTLE EGRET in South Mountain on the 7th was of interest.

The weather was bad to appalling (on the 6th), but it may well have been a factor in the many rarities seen. An abrupt change for the better caused summer to return on the 7th. Migration is now over. Between now and August, only stragglers can be expected to arrive, and as always the hope is that there are some rarities among them.

A few late WATERBIRDS were of note this week. 80 BRANT were at Shirley’s Bay on the 5th. A WHITE-WINGED SCOTER was at Innis Point on the 4th, and a SURF SCOTER was above the Deschenes Rapids on the 4th, COMMON GOLDENEYE was in the area on the 3rd, and 2 LESSER SCAUP were at Shirley’s bay as recently as the 8th. Finally among the waterbirds, 2 AMERICAN COOTS were at Embrun on the 5th, and one was at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 5-6th.

2 RUDDY TURNSTONES were at the Moodie Drive Ponds on the 3rd, and a SEMIPALMATED PLOVER there on the 5th, but otherwise there were just a few lingering DUNLIN and SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS.

ARCTIC TERNS were a disappointment this year. 2 were seen briefly at Britannia on the 3rd, but fortunately there was one at the Moodie Drive ponds on the 6-7th. A late LESSER BLACK-BACKED GULL was somewhat regular here as well.

A late YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER was on Blais Road on the 7th.

The only thing notable in the PASSERINE department was a SEDGE WREN seen on Torbolton Ridge Road on the 2nd, but not since. Otherwise, birders are just enjoying the many nesting species during this nesting prime time. The best areas are large tracts of unbroken forest with water. Larose forest is excellent with 16 nesting species of WARBLERS including the scarce CAPE MAY WARBLER on Bertrand Road. Gatineau Park (north and west), and the Lac la Blanche area are as good or better.


Ottawa and area bird sightings to 1 June 2017

by Greg Zbitnew at sightings@ofnc.ca


Willet photographed in Embrun by Mark Gawn.


2 rarities highlighted the week, as migration winds down. On the 27th, a WILLET (western) was at Embrun most of the day, and was seen by many. This was the first local sighting since 2009. On the 31st, a WHITE PELICAN flew over Britannia Woods, headed west. This was the first local sighting in a number of years. Unfortunately this bird was not relocated.

PASSERINE migration is probably about 99% complete. SHOREBIRD migration is peaking or will be in a few days. Weather conditions were somewhat rainy and unsettled, but not sufficientlybad to produce any fallout so far.

WATERBIRDS have pretty much reached their summer levels. A few WHITE-WINGED SCOTERS passed through, but the rivers and inland ponds/ lagoons have few birds aside from the nesters.

SHOREBIRDS provided the greatest interest this week, with 4 new for the year including the rarity. Embrun had a RED-NECKED PHALAROPE on the 27-28th, and 2 WILSON’S PHALAROPE were at the Greenbank Road flooded field on the 27th. Up to 9 RUDDY TURNSTONE were at Shirley’s Bay on the 1st. Despite this, few SHOREBIRDS of any kind were around. There is very little suitable shore habitat anywhere, and while there were plenty of flooded fields, there is no place to concentrate them. The Moodie Drive ponds have had a few SHOREBIRDS, including BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER, but as of the 31st there was nothing there. An AMERICAN COOT was at the réserve naturelle du Marais-Trépanier on the 27th.


Red-necked Phalarope photographed by Michelle Martin at Embrun.


LESSER BACK-BACKED GULL was seen occasionally at the Moodie Drive Ponds. The long-awaiting ARCTIC TERN arrived at Constance Creek on the 31st, but so far just a single one for a few minutes.

There have been a number of sightings of YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. This appears to a really good year for them as well as BLACK-BILLED CUCKOO. 4 of the latter were seen/ heard on the Osgoode Link Trail near the airport. Some good news is that the RED-HEADED WOODPECKER (1 for sure) is back at Constance Bay.

There have been a few scattered sightings of OLIVE-SIDE FLYCATCHER, most recently at Lac McGregor on the 31st. There were a few more sightings of YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER- Rockcliffe Airport on the 26th and Hurdman Woods on the 31st.

The first and so far only SEDGE WREN sighting has been in the Richmond Fen on the 27th.

Of WARBLERS, there was a late sighting of ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER in Britannia on the 25th, but mostly we are now in nesting season.


Dunlin photographed at Petrie Island by Keith Wickens.


Earlier sightings available on request ofnc@ofnc.ca

Top of Page

© Ottawa Field-Naturalists' Club
This page was revised on 17 August 2017
Contact the OFNC